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A series of empirically observed Comet 29P outbursts from January 2008 to April 2010

The necessary information in the table below (first four columns) for the barycentric case study of Comet 29P/Schwassmann–Wachmann 1 outbursts, was extracted from the table 2 on page 12 of the paper for "OUTBURST ACTIVITY IN COMETS: II. A MULTI-BAND PHOTOMETRIC MONITORING OF COMET 29P/SCHWASSMANN-WACHMANN 1".

The dates of those outburst events for Comet 29P were used in JPL Small-Body Database Browser to obtain their 3D interactive orbit diagrams with its last known trajectory, and these are thus used to approximately locate the barycentric coordinates of the four gas giants, their Lagrangian points, and their alignment with the comet. The orbit of this comet during this observational period was stable, and thus these illustrated orbit diagrams as shown below are technically valid. The manually indicated nodes and their alignments with the comet in the orbit diagrams with reference to their observed peak magnitude and increase of magnitude, were then used to visually hunt for the plausible catalysts that could have had triggered those outburst events.

The number of times brightened for each of the Comet 29P outburst events were calculated with "Advanced magnitude calculator", and listed next to its apparent magnitude increase for layman comprehension.

Reportedly, the apparent R magnitude of Comet 29P with the coupled effect of its conjunction and opposition position with Earth, was normally observed to be around +16 at the perihelion, around +19 at the aphelion, but sometimes it had been observed to be around +10 during its outbursts with increased absolute magnitude.

Case event

Outburst date
Observed peak
R magnitude
Magnitude increase
Times
brightened
Remarks on the encounters of Comet 29P with the barycentric coordinates of the four gas giants, their Lagrangian points and alignments.
1
Jan. 14.8, 2008
+12.4
3.8
33.11
Comet 29P was very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn. 
2
Mar. 13.8, 2008
+14.2
2.0
6.31
Comet 29P at above the invariable plane was quite aligned with the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Uranus, and the barycentric coordinate of Saturn and Uranus.
3
Sep. 25.1, 2008
+11.8
4.1
43.65
Comet 29P was very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn. 
4
Dec. 23.2, 2008
+12.5
3.3
20.89
Comet 29P was again very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn. It also almost attained the similar R magnitude like it did on 14th January 2008.
5
Jan. 3.1, 2009
+12.6
1.0
2.51
Comet 29P was quite near to the L3 Lagrangian point of Jupiter, and quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and the barycentric coordinate of Saturn and Neptune.
6
Feb. 8.8, 2009
+12.7
2.7
12.02
Comet 29P was for the third time very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn. It also almost attained the similar R magnitude like it did on 23rd December 2008. 
7
Feb. 21.7, 2009
+13.3
1.3
3.31
Comet 29P was again quite near to the L3 Lagrangian point of Jupiter, and quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and the barycentric coordinate of Saturn and Neptune.
8
Apr. 22.8, 2009
+14.8
1.4
4.37
Comet 29P was very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Uranus, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and the barycenter of Saturn and Uranus. 
9
Sep. 23.1, 2009
(+13.9)
(2.0)
6.31
Comet 29P was for the fourth time very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn. Jupiter was angularly crossing Neptune at this moment. 
10
Nov. 10.2, 2009
+13.5
2.4
9.12
Comet 29P was for the third time quite near to the L3 Lagrangian point of Jupiter, and quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and the barycentric coordinate of Saturn and Neptune. Jupiter had angularly crossed Neptune at this moment.
11
Feb. 3.2, 2010
+11.7
4.3
52.48
Comet 29P was for the fifth time very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn. Jupiter had angularly crossed Neptune at this moment. 
- Comet.29P outburst image captured on 8th February 2010.
12
Apr. 16.8 2010
+12.7
3.5
25.12
Comet 29P was again very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Uranus, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and the barycenter of Saturn and Uranus. 

This case study on the twelve outbursts of Comet 29P, suggests its cometary outburst were correlated to its encounter with the barycentric coordinates of the four gas giants in the Solar System, their Lagrangian points, and its alignment with these nodes of spinor field in the Solar System. Peculiarly, during this period, Comet 29P in its slightly inclined orbit to the invariable plane was presumed to be swinging in and out of its alignment with some barycenters, Lagrangian points, and particularly, Saturn. Also, a brighter outburst event was assumed to be triggered by being at proximity and nearer to a significant spinor field, or a supposedly stronger spinor field, or a composite effect of multiple significant spinor fields.

Apparently, in an overall oscillation when the comet was moving nearer to a significant spinor field, and also aligned itself with this and another nearby significant spinor field, or gas giant, as could be obviously observed in the orbit diagrams for some case events, it brightened up, then when it moved away, it dimmed down. And when the effects of two significant spinor fields were converging and aligned with a much nearer approach of the comet, as demonstrated with its event circumstances on 20th January 2011 for this outburst, it was brightened up by around 100 times.

Evidently, the overall oscillation was primarily rendered by the complex angular motion of the four gas giants, their contributing barycentric coordinates, and the contributing Lagrangian points. For example, the relative retrograde motion for the barycenter of Jupiter and Neptune, the angular cross over of Jupiter and Neptune, and the differential motion between elliptic orbits with different orbital elements in the Solar System reference frame, had caused the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune to move back and forth from Comet 29P, as well as had moved in and out the orbit of this comet, and thus had caused its multiple in and out of alignment with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn, and had thus switched its cometary outburst on and off.

And for the brightest outburst empirically observed for Comet 29P on around 12th January 2008 in Japan with an apparent magnitude of about +9,3, which is almost a ten thousand-fold different in brightness as compared with its dimmest observation at the apparent magnitude of about +19, and this is despite of it was positioned at near its aphelion at then. As demonstrated with its event circumstances for this outburst, Comet 29P at near the opposition of Earth, was quite near to the L3 Lagrangian points of Jupiter, it was also quite near to the L3 Lagrangian point of a barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and the L3 Lagrangian point of a barycenter rendered by Jupiter, Neptune, and Uranus. And it was quite aligned with Saturn and the two nearby L3 Lagrangian points of the two barycenters. And comparing this event circumstances to the event circumstances for all its other lower intensity outbursts that were investigated herein, this apparently was the catalyst that has had the strongest compounded effect for rendering this brightest outburst.

All orbital elements of involved Solar System objects for any of these outburst events for Comet 29P can be scrutinized by launching this JPL Small-Body Database Browser applet with the pre-selected comet on a MS WIndows 7 computer. After launching the applet, type in the date of the particular outburst event of this comet, a 3D interactive orbit diagram for a specific outburst event of Comet 29P is thus setup. The orbit diagram can be panned, tilted, zoom in or zoomed out for visual inspection on orbital elements of those involved Solar System objects for verifying any alignment.

See the UVS subtopic on "Cometary outburst" for further elaboration on the spinor field rendered by barycenter effect, and more illustrations for outburst events of this and other comets.



Case event 1: Observed with 33.11 times increased in brightness, and +12.4 for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P was very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn.



Case event 2: Observed with 6.31 times increased in brightness, and +14.2 for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P at above the invariable plane was quite aligned with the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Uranus, and the barycentric coordinate of Saturn and Uranus.



Case event 3: Observed with 43.65 times increased in brightness, and +11.8 for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P was very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Uranus, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn.


Case event 4: Observed with 20.89 times increased in brightness, and +12.5 for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P was again very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn. It also almost attained the similar R magnitude like it did on 14th January 2008.


Case event 5: Observed with 2.51 times increased in brightness, and +12.6 for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P was quite near to the L3 Lagrangian point of Jupiter, and quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and the barycentric coordinate of Saturn and Neptune.


Case event 6: Observed with 12.02 times increased in brightness, and +12.7 for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P was for the third time very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn. It also almost attained the similar R magnitude like it did on 23rd December 2008.


Case event 7: Observed with 3.31 times increased in brightness, and +13.3 for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P was again quite near to the L3 Lagrangian point of Jupiter, and quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and the barycentric coordinate of Saturn and Neptune.


Case event 8: Observed with 4.37 times increased in brightness, and +14.8 for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P was very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Uranus, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and the barycenter of Saturn and Uranus.


Case event 9: Observed with 6.31 times increased in brightness, and (+13.9) for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P was for the fourth time very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn. Jupiter was angularly crossing Neptune at this moment.


Case event 10: Observed with 9.12 times increased in brightness, and +13.5 for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P was for the third time quite near to the L3 Lagrangian point of Jupiter, and quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and the barycentric coordinate of Saturn and Neptune. Jupiter had angularly crossed Neptune at this moment.


Case event 11: Observed with 52.48 times increased in brightness, and +11.7 for peak magnitude.
Remarks: Comet 29P was for the fifth time very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Neptune, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and Saturn. Jupiter had angularly crossed Neptune at this moment.
- Comet.29P outburst image captured on 8th February 2010.


Case event 12: Observed with 25.12 times increased in brightness, and +12.7 for peak magnitude
Remarks: Comet 29P was again very near and approaching the L3 Lagrangian point of the barycenter rendered by Jupiter and Uranus, and it was quite aligned with this L3 Lagrangian point and the barycenter of Saturn and Uranus.

 

Disclaimers: This case study with some degree of biasness, errors, and omissions for its remarks to fit the observations, merely illustrates with its post analyses for what were obvious on those significant barycentric coordinates of the four gas giants, their Lagrangian points, and the alignment of Comet 29P with these manually indicated nodes. Not all aspects were thoroughly investigated for these case studies, and the proposed catalysts might not be the actual and exact triggers for the outburst events.

A dedicated 3D planetary applet with much accurate positions for the Solar System objects that features barycentric coordinates and Lagrangian points, would be required for improving the analyses for these cometary outburst events.

 

 

 

 

The inception for this case study was manually prepared and compiled by Vincent Wee-Foo on 1st August 2014.

References and links:

OUTBURST ACTIVITY IN COMETS: II. A MULTI-BAND PHOTOMETRIC MONITORING OF COMET 29P/SCHWASSMANN-WACHMANN 1
- Josep M. Trigo-Rodríguez [1,2], D. A. García-Hernández [3,4], Albert Sánchez [5], Juan Lacruz [6], Björn J.R. Davidsson [7], Diego Rodríguez [8], Sensi Pastor [9], and José A. de los Reyes [9].

1. Institute of Space Sciences (CSIC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, Torre C-5 pares, 2a pl., 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain. E-mail: trigo@ieec.uab.es
2. Institut d’Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC), Ed. Nexus, Gran Capità 2-4, 08034 Barcelona, Spain
3. Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain.
4. Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
5. Gualba Astronomical Observatory (MPC442), Barcelona, Spain.
6. La Cañada Observatory (MPC J87), Ávila, Spain.
7. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120, Uppsala, Sweden.
8. Guadarrama Observatory (MPC458), Madrid, Spain.
9. Observatorio Astronómico Municipal de Murcia (J76), La Murta, Murcia, Spain.

Comet 2P/Schwassmann–Wachmann 1 - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Advanced magnitude calculator - 1728 Software Systems
Apparent magnitude - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
JPL Small-Body Database Browser - Orbit Viewer applet originally written and kindly provided by Osamu Ajiki (AstroArts), and further modified by Ron Baalke (JPL).
Barycentric coordinates - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gas giants - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lagrangian points
- From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Comet’s 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 Great activity - Diego Rodríguez
Absolute magnitude - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Invariable plane - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Retrograde motion - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Orbital elements - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

 

 

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